Monday, April 30, 2018

The LuLac Edition #3769, April 30th, 2018

EFREM ZIMBALIST JUNIOR @ 100

We continue our series on famous births from a century ago. This week we look at the actor Efrem Zimbalist Junior who was born in 1918. He was best known for his role as Inspector Lewis Erskine on TV's long-running series, The F.B.I. He also played the role of Alfred Pennyworth on Batman: The Animated Series. But a little about him before that.
After going to school at Yale, he worked as a page for NBC radio in New York. Afterwards, he went on to serve a five-year stint in the army during World War II. He was awarded the Purple Heart for a leg wound received during the battle of Hürtgen Forest. That was a series of fierce battles fought from 19 September to 16 December 1944 between American and German forces on the Western Front during World War II. It was only 25 square feet east of the Belgian–German border. It was the longest battle on German ground during World War II, and is the longest single battle the U.S. Army has ever fought.
After the war, his big break came when he was given a contract with Warner Brothers TV. Prior to that, he was on Broadway.
Starring as Dandy Jim Buckley on the series, Maverick with James Garner. Dandy Jim was a confidence man and grafter.

After that he landed a gig on “77 Sunset Strip” In 1958, Zimbalist played the co-lead Stuart "Stu" Bailey, a popular detective series running until 1964. The vintage shows air 4am Monday through Friday on ME TV.



During this period, he made several concurrent appearances in other Warner Bros. television shows, such as Hawaiian Eye, The Alaskans, and Bronco. He also starred as the lead in several feature films for Warners, such as Bombers B-52, The Deep Six, A Fever in the Blood and The Chapman Report. Zimbalist was in such demand that he was given leave by Jack L. Warner due to exhaustion from his busy schedule.
Even with his busy schedule and “Strip”, Zimbalist even had time to cut a Christmas album.
However, after "Strip" ended, Zimbalist was most widely known for his starring role as Inspector Lewis Erskine in the Quinn Martin television production The F.B.I., which premiered on September 19, 1965 and ended with its final episode on September 8, 1974.

Zimbalist was generous in his praise of producer Martin and of his own experience starring in the show. Those who worked with him on the show were equally admiring of the star's professionalism and likable personality.

Zimbalist maintained a strong personal relationship with J. Edgar Hoover, who requested technical accuracy for the show and that agents be portrayed in the best possible light. Actors who played F.B.I. employees were required by Hoover to undergo a background check. Zimbalist passed his background check with ease. He subsequently spent a week in Washington, D.C., where he was interviewed by Hoover, and at the F.B.I. Academy in Quantico, Virginia. Hoover and Zimbalist remained mutual admirers for the rest of Hoover's life. Hoover later held Zimbalist up as an image role model for F.B.I. employees to emulate in their personal appearance. 


The Society of Former Special Agents of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. honored the character of Lewis Erskine in 1985 with a set of retired credentials. On June 8, 2009 FBI Director Robert Mueller presented Zimbalist with a plaque of an honorary special agent for his work on the television series The F.B.I., on which he worked in collaboration with the Federal Bureau of Investigation and his friend J. Edgar Hoover.
Zimbalist had a recurring role as Daniel Chalmers, a white-collar con man, on his daughter Stephanie Zimbalist's TV drama “Remington Steele” and later “Hotel. 
In 1964, he joined several famous colleagues in 1963 to campaign for Barry Goldwater's presidential bid, including Walter Brennan and Chill Wills.
Zimbalist was born in New York City, the son of Jewish parents. His parents were Russian-born violinist Efrem Zimbalist Sr. and Romanian-born operatic soprano Alma Gluck. His stepmother was Mary Louise Curtis Bok Zimbalist, the founder of the Curtis Institute of Music. Both parents converted to Anglican Christianity
.Zimbalist died on May 2, 2014, from natural causes at the age of 95. (wikipdia, Warner Brothers, LuLac). (Photos: Getty Images, Newsweek, TV Guide).

Sunday, April 29, 2018

The LuLac Edition #3768, April 29th, 2018

PASHINSKI OPPONENT GOES AFTER HIM ON PROPERTY TAX REFORM
GOP candidate in the 121st Greg Wolovich (Photo: Wolovich campaign)
The primary election is not even over and done with but Greg Wolovich, the GOP candidate for Representative in the 121st sent a letter to the editor this week regarding one of his signature issues, Property Tax Reform. Here's what he wrote:
Editor: For some time now, the Property Tax Independence Act has been discussed as a way to eliminate school property taxes in Pennsylvania. Homeowners across the state have been feeling the hard-hitting effects of rising property taxes at nearly every level of government. I feel that now, especially after the tax referendum question’s enormous push last year, is the optimal time to eliminate school property taxes once and for all.
Our current legislator in the Greater Wilkes-Barre area (121st Legislative District), Edwin A. Pashinski, is standing firmly in the way of this objective. He always seems to have a list of excuses as to why school property tax elimination will not work. Most of our legislators in the area, including his fellow Democrats John Yudichak and Gerald Mullery, have either voted for or co-sponsored the bill, known as House Bill 76 / Senate Bill 76. Why will he not follow suit and stand up for his tax burdened constituents?
House Bill 76 / Senate Bill 76 would fund schools with a statewide increase in sales and income taxes, ensuring that everyone pays their fair share in supporting our education system. This would include visitors to our state who purchase our goods and services. No longer would property owners be forced to foot the bill entirely on their own.
This November, voters will have a choice against pro-property-tax Pashinski -- a hard-working, blue-collar worker who truly understands the struggles we all face day to day. I want to fight for you, not another pension. Let’s send a message to Harrisburg telling them that we want to live without fear of losing our homes and businesses.
Gregory S. Wolovich Jr.
Candidate
In the meantime, the veteran lawmaker was called out by Charles Urban who is head of the Citizen's group touting Property Tax Reform. Here's what Urban said about Pashinski in a comment on the Wolovich's Letter in the Citizen's Voice. Unlike anonymous posters, Urban used his own name: Pashinski is tied to the teachers union who funds his campaign and is against elimination of school property taxes Do you homeowners what elimination of your school taxes to protect you from losing your home. He was the head of the teachers union . He is collecting approximately $$,429.00 a month and working on his second guarantee pension as a state representative, collecting more than $80,000 in salary and Social Security.  The PSEA contributed approximately $ 23,560 to his campaign.  Does he care about you the home owner when he can help you by eliminating you school property taxes? You are the government and sent him to Harrisburg to work for you . IS HE ? Time to make a change your employee is not working for you. The choice is yours this election Elimination of your school property taxes YES or No Pashinski No Wolovich YES
Wolovich seems committed to the fight for Property Tax Reform. It is up to the Republican party in the 121st to get him the money and the support he needs to get this message out before and after the primary.


HISTORICAL SOCIETY DINNER A SUCCESS

2016 Women We Love honoree and DAR member Kathleen Smith and Wilkes Barre City Councilman Tony Brooks. (Photo: Kathleen Smith Facebook)
The annual Luzerne County Historical Society Dinner was held this past Friday night. The event was sponsored by The Berkshire Asset Management Group. Members put on a short play about the Society's newest exhibit on a topic everybody loves to talk about, the halcyon days of shopping in Downtown Wilkes Barre.
“Let’s Go Shopping! Stores of Yesteryear” takes you down memory lane taking all of us back to the shops and stores in Wilkes-Barre and Luzerne County during the 1800s and 1900s. The exhibit has items from the Society's collection of photos, documents and objects. Look for flashbacks to Woolworth’s, the store that originated in Wilkes-Barre, and local favorites including Blum Brothers and Isaac Long’s. Blum Brothers was still around in the 80s. The exhibit is open Wednesday through Friday from 2 to 6 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
The dinner marked 160 years and it was pointed out that the Luzerne County Historical Society is Pennsylvania’s oldest county historical society.

WHITE HAVEN LIBRARY EVENT A SUCCESS

Well it was another great day at White Haven today as another wonderful community event in support of their Library is in the books. From 2 to 5pm  Saturday afternoon, a large crowd enjoyed the Hops & Grapes affair.
The White Have Area Community Library started out when the community started it in the Engine House. That was where my late father, Stephen "Jake" Yonki, his brother Paul "Philco" Yonki and my confirmation Godfather, Joe "Chubby Milkanin would work out of when the snows came in the 50s and 60s for The Lehigh Valley Railroad. They'd leave Coxton in the middle of the night, and work their way down to White Haven, to that very engine house, now a Library, cleaning tracks for the trains.
Fast forward and it turns out that Mrs. FB and I have seen the growth of this event as well as The Library for over two decades. 
Plus it was a pleasant surprise to see WBRE TV's Kelly Choate there hawking the pierogies as people lined up for the taste. WBRE TV Eyewitness News was one of the sponsors of the day.
After having wonderful treats, we headed down to St. Patrick's where we attended Mass with our good friend, Father Mike Kloton. We are very fond of Father because he still calls us "kids" when he sees us. 


Here's a photo of Kelly, me and Cindy Gocek. 
 The people from Buffalo Wild Wings were there, from left to right, Cassie Klug and Alllison Tokar. 


The good folks from Red Robin were there, Taylor Cooper and Bonnie Yuscavage. 


Then there was the crowd shot.
Thanks to all who made this a success.

Thursday, April 26, 2018

The LuLac Edition #3767, April 26th, 2018

SENATE JUDICIARY COMMITTEE VOTES TO BAR TRUMP FROM FIRING MUELLER
The Senate Judiciary Committee  approved legislation protecting special counsel Robert Mueller from President Trump.
The bill passed 14-7 with four member of the President’s party voting with all of the panel’s Democrats in favor of the measure making it harder for Trump to call for Mueller’s dismissal.
It would codify Department of Justice protocols that say only a senior official can fire Mueller, who is tasked with investigating Russian election meddling and possible connections to the the Trump campaign. The other feature of the  bill also calls for a 10-day window which would guarantee an   “expedited review” of a hypothetical firing. Plus, if a court determines that the firing of a special counsel was unjustified, they would be reinstated.
The Chairman Charles Grassley voted for the bill along with three other Republicans. This would not have happened a few months ago. 

GOP CANDIDATES FOR GOVERNOR DEBATE LAST NIGHT
Paul Mango, Scott Wagner and Laura Ellsworth last night. (Photo: Channel 69)
Lancaster County was the setting for still another debate with the three Republican candidates for Governor. Paul Mango, Scott Wagner and Laura Ellsworth squared off last night. There is a scant three weeks to go before the primary election in which one of these three will face off against Governor Tom Wolf. In a switch from previous encounters, Wolf drew the ire of all three running. I mean they still were trashing each other but this time they sent some invective Wlf’s way.
Laura Ellsworth said she fears Wolf’s proposed severance tax on gas driller might have the Shale Industry shy away from Pennsylvania. Wagner focused on donations that Wolf gets from unions. He also said he would reverse Wolf’s decision on the moratorium of the death penalty in the Commonwealth. Mango, questioned the governor’s handling of Medicaid.
These issues are all hot buttons for both parties. In the primary this they rally the GOP who want to preserve the GOP ideology. But in the General, there will be Democrats defending these stances.
All three touched briefly on the negative advertising. This was the most well attended debate so far of numerous ones the candidates participated in. As we get closer, you’ll see interest pique.
Wagner leads but Mango and Ellsworth are nipping at his heels. Plus with a three way race, anything is possible.

JUSTIN BEHRENS  EVENT SALUTES VETERANS

Justin Behrens is a candidate once more for the race in the 119th. Next Saturday there will be an event in White Have worth taking a look at. Behrens came close last time to upsetting incumbent Jerry Mullery. 



COURT RULING TO TRUMP: DEFENSE WAS UNEXPLAINED AND UNIFORMED

(Photo: Newsscene1)
The Trump administration ran into that pesky thing called the Federal Courts. Tuesday a Judge ruled that President Trump had offered no legal justification for canceling DACA protections for nearly 700,000 young undocumented immigrants. Plus for the first time the ruling would require the administration to accept new applicants to the program.
The ruling made by U.S. District Judge John Bates of Washington, D.C., came after decisions by federal judges in San Francisco and New York that also rejected Trump’s rationale in halting the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. DACA. But this action, far from getting rid of it was to expand it. Bates said the government must allow others to apply.
“Each day that the agency delays is a day that aliens who might otherwise be eligible for initial grants of DACA benefits are exposed to removal (from the U.S.) because of an unlawful agency action,” Bates said. “Time is of the essence” But Bates said the Trump administration had failed to rebut findings in 2014 by the same agency under Obama, explained in detail after an extensive study, that the program was within the president’s authority to decide to deport certain groups of undocumented immigrants, those posing the greatest dangers, and allow others to remain. The prospect of a lawsuit did not add to Trump’s rationale, Bates said, especially since the program targeted by the earlier suit was different than DACA..
The bottom line here is that the Court said the Trump lawyers, had no reasons to retort the ruling and gave no justification legally for why it should be ruled out.
The administration’s defense of its action also “made no mention of the fact that DACA had been in place for five years and had engendered the reliance of hundreds of thousands of beneficiaries, many of whom had structured their education, employment, and other life activities on the assumption that they would be able to renew their DACA benefits,” Bates said.
In other words, the Presidents logic and argument was all hat and no cattle.As it stands now, the DACA people re safe. But this will end up in a huger court.  (CBS, CNN, LuLac)

CARTWRIGHT ANNOUNCES $125,500 GRANT FOR NEIGHBOR-WORKS NORTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA

Congressman Matt Cartwright (Photo: LuLac archives)

Representative Matt Cartwright announced that NeighborWorks Northeastern PA (NWNEPA), a member of the NeighborWorks network, has received $125,500 in federal grant funds from the Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation, dba NeighborWorks America. This funding will support its local affordable housing and community development activities.
NWNEPA will utilize the funding to expand their programs and services, which include financial coaching, homebuyer education & training, property acquisition and redevelopment projects, initiatives that help seniors to age with dignity in their homes, and neighborhood revitalization work in West Scranton.
“This federal funding not only strengthens our neighborhoods, respects our seniors, and helps more families find affordable housing, but it creates jobs and stimulates our local economy,” said Rep. Cartwright, a member of the House Appropriations Committee. “I continue to be a strong advocate for programs that invest in our communities and I commend the team at NWNEPA for their dedication and hard work helping local residents maintain the American Dream.
“Our goal is for our neighbors to love where they live.” said Jesse Ergott, NWNEPA’s President & CEO. “These flexible grant funds will help us to make the dream of homeownership a reality for more people, renovate and improve targeted properties, and assist our older neighbors with services that help them stay in their homes.”
NeighborWorks America recently announced $65 million in grants to its network of more than 240 nonprofit organizations located around the country. NeighborWorks organizations will use the grants to develop and manage high-quality affordable housing, help consumers set and reach their goals through financial coaching, offer homeownership education and counseling, and revitalize and strengthen communities.
"NeighborWorks America is committed to ensuring our investments are working in ways that improve people’s lives,” said Jeffrey Bryson, NeighborWorks America interim president and chief executive officer.
In fiscal year 2017, the NeighborWorks network counseled 181,400 families and individuals on financial capacity, pre-purchase, post-purchase, or foreclosure issues; owned and managed 165,500 rental homes; and created more than 43,000 jobs.
For more information about NeighborWorks Northeastern Pennsylvania go to www.nwnepa.org.
For more information about NeighborWorks America go to www.NeighborWorks.org
This program is for a nonprofit organization deeply ingrained in the community, NWNEPA has worked for more than 35 years to revitalize neighborhoods and create opportunities for individuals and families to improve their lives through quality housing and financial guidance. NWNEPA has assisted over 1,000 homebuyers with the purchase of their home, worked to improve the financial stability of over 2,500 families through financial education and coaching, renovated over 500 properties, and deployed over $1.2 million worth of volunteer labor in our community.


BARTOS CAMPAIGN LAUNCHES STATEWIDE TELEVISION AD CAMPAIGN AD WILL RUN STATEWIDE UNTIL PRIMARY ELECTION DAY
GOP candidate for Lt. Governor (Photo: Wagner-Bartos campaign)
Jeff Bartos and his campaign for Pennsylvania Lieutenant Governor have launched a statewide television ad campaign that will run until the Primary Election on Tuesday, May 15. The 15-second TV-spot will introduce Pennsylvania voters to businessman, Conservative outsider, and candidate for Lieutenant Governor, Jeff Bartos.
It is very unusual for a Lt. Governor candidate to run ads when on the ticket. But it appears that Bartos wants to make sure if his running mate Scott Wagner prevails in the Governor’ race, they will be joined at the hop until November.



BARLETTA WELCOMES SHINE STUDENTS TO U.S. CAPITOL
CONTINUES TO LEAD BIPARTISAN EFFORTS ON BEHALF OF AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAMS NATIONWIDE
Congressman Lou Barletta (Photo: Barletta office)
Congressman Lou Barletta  this week welcomed four students and several teachers and administrators from Pennsylvania’s Schools and Homes in Education (SHINE) Program to the U.S. Capitol.
SHINE is a successful afterschool program in Carbon, Luzerne, and Schuylkill counties geared towards grades K-8 and focuses on a project-based STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics) curriculum. The program links schools and homes in order to help children build a stronger academic and social foundation.
“It’s always a pleasure to meet with students like Silvia, John, Joseph, and Ayden,” Barletta said. “Their excitement about school was contagious and what they’ve been learning is very impressive. When you show children the possibility of what their futures can be and help provide them with the tools they need to reach their dreams, there is no stopping them. I’m proud of the work I’ve done on behalf of afterschool programs with my colleagues on both sides of the aisle, and I look forward to continuing to advocating for programs like SHINE.”
After arranging a tour of the U.S. Capitol for the students, Barletta met with them to talk about all they have learned while in SHINE, what they liked about the afterschool program, and what they wanted to do when they grow up. Later that evening, Barletta attended the Afterschool Alliance’s Showcase and Reception to see the projects the students had been working on, including a 3D printer and a robot that the students have learned how to program using coding. The students even made Barletta a keychain using the 3D printer.
Barletta, the Republican Co-Chair of the bipartisan Congressional Afterschool Caucus alongside his democratic colleague Representative Nita Lowey (NY-17), has long fought for programs supporting afterschool education. Most recently in March, 2018, Barletta helped secure a $20 million increase in funding for the 21st Century Community Learning Centers Program, bringing total funding up to $1.2 billion.
“The lives of thousands of children across the commonwealth of Pennsylvania and across the United States have been profoundly changed by Congressman Barletta’s dedication and commitment to supporting funding for quality after school programming,” said Rachel Strucko, Executive Director of the SHINE program. “The SHINE afterschool program is very proud to call him our Afterschool Champion,” Strucko added.
Barletta has also worked closely with state Senator John Yudichak (D-Carbon/Luzerne) to advance the critical mission of SHINE, particularly with Luzerne County host institution Wilkes University and its president, Patrick Leahy. The two began promoting the program four years ago after the success of the original SHINE Program in Carbon County, and have been instrumental in its expansion in Luzerne and Schuylkill Counties.
Barletta was previously named an “Afterschool Hero” by the Afterschool Alliance, dubbed an “Afterschool Champion” by the Pennsylvania Statewide Afterschool/Youth Development Network, and was the only House member to receive the Congressional Voice for Children Award from the National Parent Teacher Association in 2016 due to his leadership in saving federal funding for afterschool programs.

DEMOCRATS IN 9TH HOLDING FORUM

On Tuesday, May 1, 2018 there will be a Candidates Forum for the Democratic Candidates for Congress in the new 9th District. The event will be held at 7:00 PM at the Greenly Center, 50 E. Main St., Bloomsburg. This event is being sponsored by the Columbia County Democratic Committee and the Bloomsburg University Democrats.
This event is free and open to the public, but please come early, because seating is limited.
If any Democratic activist want to lend a hand, contact County Chair
Vince DeMelfi
County Chair
Columbia County Democratic Committee
246 W. Main St.
Bloomsburg, PA 17815
(cell) 570-204-3489


FORMER PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE, CARLY FIORINA, ENDORSES LAURA ELLSWORTH FOR GOVERNOR
 Carly Fiorina (Photo: AP)
Carly Fiorina, business leader, philanthropist, and 2016 candidate for the Republican presidential nomination, today endorsed Laura Ellsworth for Governor of Pennsylvania, calling her “an exemplary leader with the skills for the new century.”
“Laura Ellsworth possesses the drive, principles, and conservative values to bring Pennsylvania into the forefront of the 21st Century economy,” Fiorina said. “She has been continuously discussing issues, from job creation to sensible education funding.”
Fiorina became the first woman to lead a Fortune 50 company when she was named CEO of the technology company Hewlett-Packard.
Carly added that “leadership requires optimism, and that we know things can change and we know things can get better. Laura has that optimism and is the right type of citizen leader to serve in Harrisburg.”
Ellsworth has been a leader in a 2,500-person international law firm where she fought for innovators, employers, and family businesses who created more than 100,000 jobs in Pennsylvania.
She has served on more than a dozen civic organizations, including the Executive Committee of the Allegheny Conference on Community Development, as well as Chair of the Chamber of Commerce of Greater Pittsburgh and the Pennsylvania Economy League of Western Pennsylvania.
Ellsworth has been a leader of innovative workforce development programs, specifically for veterans and for youth, and has fostered connections between industry and providers of in-demand-job training.

MEDIA MATTERS

OUR BEST TO TORONTO

We extend our thoughts and prayers to our friend at Zoomer Radio in Toronto in light of the fact that this week more than ten of their citizens were killed. The incident happened Monday when a driver ran over pedestrians.


WALN TV

BOLD GOLD COMMUNITY FORUM

Tune in Sunday morning at 6 on 94.3 The Talker; 6:30 on 1400-The Game, NEPA's Fox .Sports Radio and 106.7 fm; and at 7:30 on 105 The River.

ECTV LIVE

ECTV Live welcomes Gina Malsky to the program during the week of April 30th. Ms. Malsky will outline plans for this year's West Pittston Cherry Blossom Festival! Rusty Fender handles the hosting chores while David DeCosmo is off.
ECTV Live can be seen on Comcast channel 19 (61 in some areas) and is aired during the Noon, 6pm and Midnight hours each day of the week. Following Monday's Live program the show will become available on Electric City Television's YouTube channel which can be viewed on your computer.


BUDDY RUMCHEK

Want to hear some great parodies on the news? Tune in to WILK Radio at 6:40 and 8:40 AM on Mondays. As Ralph Cramden used to say, “It’s a laugh riot!”

BOBBY V IS BACK THIS SUNDAY!!!!!!

Tune in to Bobby V's  Doo Wop Sock Hop this Sunday, 6P to 9P on The River 105 and 103.5 Go back to the beginning of Rock and Roll.

1960

Our 1960 logo

The West African nation of Togo, formerly a French colony, became independent, as the Togolese Republic was proclaimed at 12:10 a.m. local (and GMT) in Lomé. Sylvanus Olympio became the new nation's first President. The symbolic first raising of the new flag was confounded by tangled ropes and the problem was not resolved until later in the hour…. 
The construction of what would become Shea Stadium, at Flushing, Queens, was approved by New York City's Board of Estimate, 20–2, giving the proposed Continental League the chance to launch. The Continental League never played, but the stadium gave the National League the impetus to return to the city, with the New York Mets. One of the first widely publicized stories of hysterical strength happened in Tampa, Florida, when Mrs. Florence Rogers, a 123-pound woman, lifted one end of a 3,600 pound car that had fallen off of a jack and onto her 16-year-old son, Charles Trotter. Mrs. Rogers, an LPN, fractured several vertebrae in the process....


When more than 100 black protesters marched on to a "whites only" beach in Biloxi, Mississippi, for a "wade-in" to force desegregation, they were attacked by several hundred white people, while Harrison County sheriff's deputies at the scene stood by. The violence then spilled over into the most violent riot in Mississippi history. A U.S. Department of Justice suit ended beach segregation the following month……in Pennsylvania Governor David Lawrence refuses to speculate on who might be Vice President on the Democratic side when there is no clear winner for the nomination yet…..Nesbitt Park under the Pierce Street Bridge is cleared for recreation and fifty eight years ago the number one song in LuLac land and America was “Cathy’s Clown” by The Everly Brothers.

Wednesday, April 25, 2018

The LuLac Edition #3766, April 25th, 2018

WRITE ON WEDNESDAY

Our “Write On Wednesday” logo

This week we take a look at the Republican Governor’s race and the impact it might have on voters because of its negative tenor. Premier Pennsylvania political reporter John Baer gives us his take on the tone being set by the GOP opponents.

ON THE UGLY TONE OF THE GOP RACE FOR GOVERNOR | JOHN BAER

Hard to say exactly what to call the Republican primary race for governor.
But the words nasty, vacuous and damaging to democracy come to mind.
It also strikes me as a campaign in a counterintuitive moment.
As the rest of the world shows surging interest in public affairs with increased numbers of candidates at all levels and hard evidence of efforts to make politics better, Pennsylvania offers up an old-time race of noxious noise.
Sweet music to incumbent Gov. Wolf, for sure. And for one of the three GOP candidates. But for the public good? Not so much.
The race features tons of TV money for negative ads by two candidates: Paul Mango and party-endorsed Scott Wagner, both of whom seem bent on proving who is worse rather than who is better.
Wagner’s ad calls Mango a “phony.” Mango’s ad has Wagner as an unattractive cartoon character, labeled a slumlord, a “sleazy” bail bondsman, a deadbeat dad, and more. It’s both brutal and demeaning.
State GOP Chairman Val DiGiorgio called it “misleading” and urged Mango to take it down, saying it undermines party chances against Wolf in the fall.
Ah, but Mango campaign aide Matt Beynon said the ad is not only staying up, the campaign is increasing its statewide airtime “due to the overwhelmingly positive response.”
It hammers Wagner on issues, in some cases, decades old, including charges he faced in his 2014 state Senate race, and prior to his GOP endorsement in February.
A few details.
Ad says Wagner was sued for renting ratty apartments in the 1980s. Wagner spokesman Andrew Romeo says that tenants sued because they were evicted, and that Wagner won the case.
Ad says Wagner, as a bail bondsman in the ’80s, did a bond for an accused child predator who then “abused again.” Romeo says Wagner did “his job” providing a bond for a defendant; what happened after that isn’t his fault.
Ad says Wagner was “hauled into court” in 2012, ordered to pay $800K in back alimony and child support. Romeo says Wagner “always paid children support on time.” Payments in question were retroactive increases following a two-year dispute over Wagner’s (hefty) income during four years after his 2008 divorce, Romeo said.
No candidate wants this sort of baggage opened. It’s stuff that can be made to look worse than it is. But such is life on this campaign trail. Which includes a Wagner ad attacking Mango.
It calls Mango a “phony” for using actors in ads — as if that’s never done.
It says Mango, a retired health-care consultant, was “the leading advocate for Obamacare.” A stretch. Mango maybe liked parts of Obamacare. In a 2009 interview with the Economist magazine, for example, Mango said President Barack Obama’s health-care reforms (enacted in 2010) could help hospitals. But “the leading advocate for Obamacare?” Pretty sure that was Obama.
And Wagner’s ad calls Mango a “Wolf contractor” who snagged a $2 million government contract from the incumbent. Another stretch.
The international (27,000-employee) firm Mango worked for until last year, McKinsey & Co., did get a $1.8 million contract from the administration to study the state budget. I thought it was mostly a waste of money, and wrote that. But there’s no evidence Mango had anything to do with it.
And the sole citation from Wagner’s camp suggesting a link is a letter to the editor in the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review from a GOP operative saying, “Mango and his global-consulting partners” got “a sweetheart deal” from Wolf.
Nothing new in campaign ads overreaching or being nasty. It often works. But it also often turns off voters. So, we’ll see.
Meanwhile, a few things seem certain. The tone of this campaign makes the third GOP candidate, Pittsburgh lawyer Laura Ellsworth, who is underfunded and not engaged in attacks, sound better. It creates a narrative that helps Wolf. And it assures neither Wagner nor Mango will win this year’s Allegheny College Prize for Civility in Public Life in Pennsylvania.
http://www.philly.com/philly/columnists/john_baer/pennsylvania-gov-wolf-mango-wagner-20180409.html

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

The LuLac Edition #3765, April 24th, 2108

MAYBE I’M AMAZED

Our Maybe I’m Amazed” logo.

MAYBE I'M AMAZED .....that more than half of the world’s geysers are found in Yellowstone National Park.
MAYBE I’M AMAZED…that New York City appears to be one of the most religious ones in the world. Also in terms of language, it leads the way too. The 8.4 million inhabitants communicate in some 800 different languages across the five boroughs – the Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, and Staten Island. 83% of New Yorkers are affiliated to some organized religion.
MAYBE I’M AMAZED…..that in those iconic James Bond movies, Bond has 23 vodka martinis, 6 of which he orders himself but two of those he never receives. The rest are prepared and brought to him. Most surprisingly, in his 7 appearances as Bond, Sean Connery utters the phrase “shaken, not stirred” only once, in Goldfinger. In Fleming’s novels, Bond drinks gin martinis instead of vodka martinis.
MAYBE I’M AMAZED……..that the all time selling duo of country music is not Johnny and June Carter Cash, is not Dolly Parton and Kenny Rogers but Brooks and Dunn. They retired a few years ago but because of popular demand have come back more than a few times.

MAYBE I’M AMAZED…..but really not that the late First Lady Barbara Bush corresponded with a youngster who named her heffer after her. She wrote back and forth on the updates provided by the child. That’s was being real and very, very classy.
MAYBE I’M AMAZED…….that Pope Benedict XVIth turned 91 and is still around five years after retiring. Benedict in my estimation had a very tough act to follow. Keep in mind he succeeded Pope John Paul II after a 27 year reign by the Polish Pontiff. 
Benedict served the Papacy well by knowing enough to step aside when he knew his age might be a detriment to church leadership. Many even question why he was picked. Well in my view he was a transition Pope. The thought was by picking a 78 year old Cardinal, the conclave hoped to have him serve as a bridge from John Paul II to Benedict’s successor. History will show that Benedict’s brief reign served as that bridge that was intended all along.
MAYBE I’M AMAZED…..that there are 656 morsels in that 12 ounce bag of Nestle Morsels. And no I didn’t count them.
MAYBE I’M AMAZED…continuing on the chocolate vein here, is that the original recipe for chocolate called for chili powder instead of granulated sugar.
MAYBE I’M AMAZED…..that as I enjoy those new flavored Diet Cokes, Orange, Cherry, Lime Ginger and Mango, I’m getting concerned because I see them on sale in cans at the price of 4 for a buck. As I told the checkout guy at Price Chopper, the last time I got a Coke for a quarter was when I was in high school. Anyway, here’s one of my favorite ads for this product.

Love that woman!
MAYBE I’M AMAZED…..that the key thing many people are ignoring in the North Korean Dictator’s statement about nuclear weapons is Kim saying that he will stop extending his program. But what about the ones he still has? While this is a step in the right direction, let’s hope the President doesn’t give away the store for a quick win in the face of the overwhelming odds that our American President may not serve out this term.
MAYBE I’M AMAZED….that the first popsicle cane about in 1905 because of an 11 year old boy. Young Frank Epperson didn’t set out to create a treat that would keep kids happy and cool on summer days for generations to come. He mixed some soda powder and water in a glass with a small wooden stirrer, then adventure called and he wandered off and forgot about his drink. It remained outside overnight. It was cold in the San Francisco Bay area that night.
When Epperson went outside the next morning, he discovered the first-ever Popsicle waiting for him, trapped frozen inside its glass. He ran the glass under hot water and was able to pull the icy treat out using the stirrer. He licked the frozen treat off the stirrer and decided it was pretty good. History was made and an entrepreneur was born. Epperson named the treat an Epsicle, taking credit where it was due, and began selling them around the neighborhood.
Beyond the Neighborhood
Fast-forward 18 years to 1923. Epperson saw a bigger and better future for his Epsicle and he applied for a patent for his "frozen ice on a stick.” He described the treat as a “frozen confection of attractive appearance, which can be conveniently consumed without contamination by contact with the hand and without the need for a plate, spoon, fork or other implement.” Epperson recommended birch, poplar or wood-bass for the stick.
Now a grown man with children of his own, Epperson deferred to their judgment and renamed the treat Popsicle, as in “Pop’s Sickle.” He moved beyond the neighborhood and began selling his Popsicles at a California amusement park. He was later bought out by Lowe's who put the popsicles together and there you go. 
As a kid growing up, my favorite popsicle came from Charlie's, a place out of Erie Avenue in West Pittston that had these incredible raspberry creamsicles with vanilla ice cream.  It was owned by the Simalchick Family. That was long ago but now my go to is Outshine. Grape and Lime.
(Thought.com, Lulac)

Monday, April 23, 2018

The LuLac Edition #3764, April 23rd, 2018

GOP CHALLENGERS TO CARTWRIGHT TO DEBATE THIS WEEK

The three Republican candidates running for the chance to take on Matt Cartwright will debate Thursday, May 3, at the Moskovitz Theater at the DeNaples Center at 7pm.
Joe Peters, of Scranton, a former state deputy attorney general, political commentator on WNEP, former radio host and Scranton policeman, John Chrin, a very credible and experienced Wall Street executive who is from Northampton County and Robert Kuniegel, of Spring Brook Twp are all vying for the chance to take on the three term incumbent. Cartwright is unopposed as a Democrat in the new 8th.
The debate might serve to separate the three candidates and bring a front runner to the fore.  The operative word there is “might” folks. Debates give those attending the facts they need or the chance to show their selected candidate that the attendee is behind him all the way. In many cases, they rarely move the needle.
But this race is going to be a tug of war in my view. Joe Peters is a known quantity. He narrowly missed winning statewide office in the early 2000s and last ran for Attorney General. His base is Lackawanna County but that GOP organization is pretty pathetic there, especially in Scranton. As a TV analyst on WNEP and WNEP2 he is a known well personality. Plus his association with his dad, Gene Peters, who is still revered as a truly successful Mayor in the 70s can’t hurt him. The question is can he reach the Republican areas of Pike and Wayne County with a message with the funds he has.
Why we pose that question is because John Chrin, the Wall Street Executive is spending a lot of money to get his message out. Plus he has been knocking on doors, getting his own signatures in many cases to meet people and is running an energetic effort to connect with as many hard core primary voters as possible. Chrin has the backing of the powerful and active 120th District Republicans. He has made visits to LuLac land in the last few weeks.
Last evening he was in Wyoming at the famous Avenue Diner for a meet and greet with enthusiastic supporters. Chrin wants to make it to the general to contest Matt Cartwright in the fall. But for the primary it is a big unknown whether Pike and Wayne can pull him through.His people seem to think that and so does he.
A third candidate is Robert Kuniegel who has been running ads since last year. He’s from Springbrook Township and is a retired state corrections officer. He’s running on being a native from the district, doing Electronic Town Hall meetings and is asking for a national Polygraph test for government employees. His concern is blackmail. This from his website. We should offer every paid employee an opportunity to voluntarily be drug tested & undergo a polygraph test and ask them if they have done anything that could be considered not ethical, that could be used to control the way they vote, this would take care of those that are being blackmailed. Blackmailing politicians is a sophisticated industry and we can no longer put our national security at risk. Kunigiel is talking about draining the swamp and is running against Hillary Clinton. From his websiite, here's a retweet that caught my eye.  Robert J Kuniegel Retweeted Dinesh D'Souza
If someone went back to HRC being fired from the Watergate investigation to present day, add up all the billable hours spent investigating her actions what kind of $'s would there be? Where there is smoke there is fire. This is one of the most corrupt political figures ever.
Okay, but that kind of begs the question that what does that have to do with Chrin, Peters and Cartwright? If he brings this stuff up in the debate, then we have a two way race between Chrin and Peters.
The debate is this week.
Meanwhile here are links from Kuniegel and Chrin on Sam Lesante’s Show on the Public Access station from Hazleton.These shows were taped when both men thought they were running in the 17th but worth the watch.



Plus here’s a radio ad from Joe Peters.

Here are a few scenes from last night’s event in Wyoming with John Chrin that included one of the best State Representatives from this area, EVER, Aaron Kaufer. The GOP party faithful were out in full force. State committee people like Steve Urban, Lynette Villano, Laurie Vandermark and Bill Lewis were around pressing the flesh. Former Chair Bill Urbanski and State Senator Lisa Baker attended too. The event was put together by 120th District Chair P.J. Pribula. More than 80 people packed The Avenue on a beautiful Sunday night when they could have been doing something else. 
 State Representative Aaron Kaufer is seen with 8th District candidate for Congress John Chren and former Luzerne County Council member and current State Committee member Steve Urban. 


Had a chance to chat with Justin Beherns who is running in the 119th against Gerald Mullery. Last time he came close and this time might be the charm. He's having an event in White Haven on May 5th to honor veterans. We'll share more on that later this week. 
John Chrin was at the tail end of a busy day. The candidate for 8th District for Congress was in 5 counties earlier in the day.  Chrin said that the fight for the 8th in the General would be one of the most important races nationally.
 120th District Chair P.J. Pribula put together the spring event at The Avenue. Pribula has been a virtual force of nature since becoming involved in GOP politics. Pribula  told the group that he felt the Trump wave of 2016 was not over in Pennsylvania. Citing his interactions as a contractor, he claimed that there was a quiet wave out there that would work to the advantage of the Republican party. He cited the booming economy and stock market, more money in worker's paychecks as well as what he called the historic news from North Korea.  
On guns, I know he was playing to this roomful of Republicans when he spoke of the Second Amendment. Saying that Democrats wanted to get rid of the guns via the Amendment, well that's where he took a sideways turn. I understand the belief of the party on this but no Democratic President, Johnson, Carter, Clinton and Obama ever took action against the Second Amendment. Furthermore, if those red states couldn't ratify the ERA, Equal Rights Amendment for women, (it takes all 50 states to obtain or get rid of an amendment) then they sure as hell wouldn't stand a chance to get rid of any guns or the Second Amendment. 
But I digress. 
Pribula, a personal friend of GOP front runner for Governor Scott Wagner spoke of the bitter primary fight and very tough campaign ads between Wagner and Paul Mango. He made the point that after the primary, the party has to unite and put aside differences to pry the Governor's office away from Tom Wolf. 
Pribula then asked people in the room to raise their hands if, like he, they were former Democrats, a number of hands went up. 
That seemed to be a significant factor in the hopes of John Chrin and his aforementioned opponents running  in the 8th to turn the newly reformed district red from blue. 
It will be a tough nut to crack but people in that room last night are going to go to every length to see if they could make that happen. 
(Photos: Mrs. LuLac, your blog editor) 

Friday, April 20, 2018

The LuLac Edition #3763, April 20th, 2018

ACTION RALLY ON SUNDAY

Action Together NEPA is pleased to announce its “Rally for Our Planet Earth Day Celebration” on Earth Day, on Sunday, April 22nd, at 1 pm on Public Square.
Presenters include:
Dr. Cosima Wiese, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Biology, Misericordia University
Dr. Brian Mangan, Department Chair, Professor of Environmental Science and Biology, King’s College
Dr. Ken Klemow Professor of Biology and GeoEnvironmental Science, Wilkes-University
Dr. Colby Tanner, Assistant Professor of Biology, Misericordia University
Robert E. Hughes Executive Director for the Eastern Pennsylvania Coalition for Abandoned Mine Reclamation
Music by Don Shappelle & Friends
Action Together NEPA is a grassroots activist organization dedicated to community action, political advocacy and real progress.


OPIOID FORUM A SUCCESS
From left to right, front row, panel member Carol Coolbaugh, Sir Knight Blaise Dente, moderator Carmen Ambrosino. Second row, Luzerne County Coroner William Lisman, Sir Knight Leonard Pribula Junior, your blog editor and 4th Degree member, Judge Michael Vough, former Grand Knight and Choir member Richard Korpusik and current Grand Knight of Council #372 Dennis Palladino. (Photo: Mrs. LuLac)

The Opioid Forum presented by the President John F. Kennedy heritage Council #372 was a huge success. Before a packed crowd, the panelists led by moderator Carmen Ambrosino gave compelling presentations. Panelists were Carol Coolbaugh, area addiction activist, Judge Michael Vough and Coroner William Lisman. Here’s a wrap up from the Pittston Dispatch on line:
Residents packed the John P. Cosgrove Center in the Pittston Memorial Library Thursday evening eager to learn about the dangers of opioid addiction.
Not only did they learn about that, they also learned of the impact those drugs and other drugs have on families and loved ones through the stories told by those who’ve seen the horrors first hand.
An Opioid Fact Forum was sponsored by the Heritage Knights of Columbus President John F. Kennedy #372 Council #948 Assembly and the Jacquelines Auxiliary. It was the idea of Knights of Columbus member David Yonki.
“(The Knights) put me in charge of the family committee and that was the reason I decided to make it a little more relevant and bring these issues that we have in the 21st century to light,” Yonki said.
The forum consisted of a panel that included Luzerne County Coroner Bill Lisman, Luzerne County Court of Common Please Judge Michael Vough, and Advocate Carol Coolbaugh who shared their stories.
The panel was moderated by Carmen Ambrosino, a 45-year addiction specialist and former CEO of Wyoming Valley Drug and Alcohol Services.
“Dave Yonki asked if I would moderate it because of my years in the field,” Ambrosino said. “I brought in Bill Lisman and Carol, and I reached out to Mike Vough. And then I helped with a lot of the publicity and all, but Dave Yonki did the Herculean share of that.”
Lisman shared stories about his experience as a coroner and all the drug-related deaths he’s dealt with while Vough spoke about the people who have come in front of him in court for drug-related crimes.
Carol Coolbaugh, however, shared a more personal story as she spoke about how drug addiction took her son’s life in 2009.
She shared the story to keep his memory alive and to show the human nature of drug overdoses.
“I think your biggest fear is that the memory will be lost,” Coolbaugh said. “People won’t talk about them and they’ll forget about them. We did a lot of statistics tonight, and Eric (my son) was one of those statistics, but he was much more than that. He was my son. He was a father. He was a brother. He was a person.”
Coolbaugh has been sharing her son’s story since his passing and is also an advocate for GRASP (Grief Recovery After Substance Passing.)
Her mission is to help people turn their tragedies into positives, much like she is doing with her own tragedies.
“I spent so much energy trying to help my son that I didn’t know what to do with myself,” she said. “I was invited to speak at the D.A.R.E. (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) Program right off the bat and it just made me feel good to share his story. Hopefully, his story will help someone.”
Because of the positive turnout, Yonki said the Knights of Columbus will look into continuing events similar to the Opioid Fact Forum.
“I think the turnout was outstanding,” he said. “I’m heartened by the turnout and I am thrilled by the turnout, mainly because of the fact that people in this community care, and people in this community are thirsting for more knowledge on, for better or for worse, what is an epidemic.”
Jimmy Fisher ... Bill Tarutis


THE BON-TON CLOSES

Well for me, the announcement of the closing of The Bo-Ton was sad news. That store, in Wilkes Barre as well as Wyoming was a major part of my life. As a child I saw Santa at Pomeroy’s. In Wyoming, I met the late Jim Ward who let me pass out singles to the customers coming to the store. This was during the grand opening in 1966 when the trio of Standing Ward, the late Johnny Margas and Dave Garrett presided. For me, that day was the end of the  the radio bug that had been flying around me. That day, at Pomeroy's, at Bon-Ton, it finally stung.
While my parents shopped at the Super Market at the other end of the center, I perused the store to kill time. I purchased all of my Beatles ties there as well as a beautiful golden, blue polka dot by Michael Stuart on one of the few days I got fired. I still have the tie which I wore on Pa Live a few months back.
My friends worked there. When I bought gifts for women I was dating and later on for my wife, one of the ladies who wrapped my presents, was Helen Hizny who was painstaking in the art of making beautiful packages. She was friendly, precise and when she needed to be, discreet. Joanne Rydzewski, a member of my parish and my friend Judy Cudo's mom worked at the Midway store since the day Pomerory's opened. She was in the In the Jewelry/Handbag Department. My other friends from school, Joey and David Dellarte worked there as well as their sisters Ellen and Suzanne. Numerous guys I went to King's with held down the fort at Christmas.
Many will look at the closing of the Bon-ton as just another sign of the times. To an extent, it is. But that store, has held many sweet memories for me and others of my age.
Mrs. LuLac has been resigned to the fact that I have thrown very little of my clothing away. We both agreed that saving my Bon-ton ties was a good decision. They, unlike the store will live on. As one of the ties I bought there blared out on the design, "Obladi, Oblada, Life Goes On". Life will go on without Bon-Ton, aka Pomeroy's, but it will be a  lot less sweeter than it was before this announcement.

TRUMP BASHES CALIFORNIA

The President came out with a tweet about California. Of course Trump went on about the danger of immigration and sanctuary cities but he really has missed the mark. Trump tweeted about California, which has passed a state law limiting cooperation with federal immigration enforcement.
"There is a Revolution going on in California. Soooo many Sanctuary areas want OUT of this ridiculous, crime infested & breeding concept. Jerry Brown is trying to back out of the National Guard at the Border, but the people of the State are not happy. Want Security & Safety NOW!"
That revolution, like Trump’s normalization of bullshit and hate has become the norm in California. California has changed its demographic and that will be the future of this county. That is why old white guys like Trump are hanging on for dear life to the notion that “their” America is/was great.
Deny all you want, but the demographic makeup of California will be us, or the United States in twenty five years. I’m just sorry I won’t be around to see it and enjoy the diversity this will bring.

WAGNER, MANGO CANCEL ANOTHER PUBLIC DEBATE

ELLSWORTH MAKING SOME NOISE
Laura Ellsworth (Photo: WHYY.com)
Republican gubernatorial candidate Laura Ellsworth today took her two primary opponents to task for once again forcing the cancellation of a debate, this one on educational needs in Pennsylvania.
Excellent Schools PA, the debate’s sponsor, cancelled the April 24 event after Republican Scott Wagner refused to attend and Paul Mango declined based on Wagner’s rejection, according to Stephen DeMaura, executive director of Excellent Schools.
“Mango and Wagner remain more focused on each other than they do on the issues facing Pennsylvania’s citizens,” Ellsworth said. “Excellent Schools PA is one of the leading organizations in the field of education reform, and the challenges facing our schools are immense. People seeking public office have a moral obligation to discuss education. Instead, Wagner and Mango are avoiding these issues of substance.”
To date, Mango and Wagner have engaged in a campaign mud fest, filled with personal attacks and cartoonish negative ads that have shed no light on where either man stands on the challenges facing Pennsylvania’s 500 public school districts and their 1.7 million students.
“Pennsylvania’s voters deserve to hear what their candidates will actually do if elected, especially when it comes to educating our young people,” Ellsworth said.
The Pennsylvania Department of Education has said 51 percent of schools in Pennsylvania fail to meet a benchmark score of 70 on the school performance measure, and only 46 percent of students tested were able to meet grade-level math skills.
“These are issues the candidates should discuss and debate – in public, where voters can decide which prospective governor has a better grasp of the issues and the most plausible solution,” Ellsworth said. “Mango and Wagner have once again shown that they aren’t interested in issues and are willing to keep the discussion from even taking place.”
A Pittsburgh attorney and civic leader, Ellsworth has traveled the state in the past month with her campaign message of jobs and education. (Ellsworth campaign)

THEN THERE’S THIS…………….POLL SUGGESTS ELLSWORTH MOST PLAUSIBLE REPUBLICAN AGAINST WOLF IN NOVEMBER

Recent polling strongly suggests that Pittsburgh Republican Laura Ellsworth is now moving into second place among the most viable challengers to incumbent Democratic Governor Tom Wolf.
A Muhlenberg University Poll last week showed Ellsworth statistically even with Pittsburgh millionaire Paul Mango in a series of hypothetical matchups with incumbent Democrat Tom Wolf.
The Muhlenberg poll did not do a straight candidate preference question in the Republican Primary but, rather, probed which of the three Republican hopefuls would pose the most significant challenge to Wolf.
Ellsworth’s results were the only ones that actually bit into Wolf’s margin by a full percentage point and increased the number of undecideds, hinting at her ability to break through with voters open to reconsidering their support for Wolf.
The Mulhlenberg Poll asked respondents how they would vote in the following general election matchups between Wolf and each Republican. (Ellsworth campaign).

TWO CUPS OF JOE

JOE PETERS

Joe Peters and your blog editor. (Photo: Mrs. LuLac)
Joe Peters is running for the Republican nomination in the 8th Congressional District to face off against incumbent Matt Cartwright. In the primary though, Peters must get by John Chrin and an insurgent named Robert Kuniegel
Peters is hoping his resume will resonate with people. He is touting this information about himself.Here are the bullet points: 
 Send a Cop to Congress
•Pro-Life
•NRA A Rated
•Cop
•Federal Mafia Prosecutor
•PA's Top Drug Prosecutor
•Served 2 Presidents Fighting Drug Trafficking & Terrorism
Joe turned out for the Opioid Abuse Seminar held Thursday presented by the President John F. Kennedy Heritage Council #372. We had a few minutes to chat.

DR. JOE LEONARDI WRITES ON BULLYING


Our good friend Dr. Joe Leonardi, writing under his pen name Scono Sciuto takes on this huge issue. We can't escape the headlines: Mass murders occurring in our schools.
These horrific crimes and events lead us to ask –
Is evil born?
or
Is evil created?
What makes a school shooter?
Is it availability of guns?
Is it mental illness?
Could it be something else?
In this novelette by Scono Sciuto we delve into the world of a young student who wanted nothing more than acceptance, yet who was greeted with torture and torment.
Explore a different point of view into one of society's greatest plagues.
From Scono....
"I'm a storyteller, one who uses the written word to tell tales. I am not a professional essayist nor English professor. My grammar is not always perfect and my sentence structure not always correct. To me, what is most important, is having the reader get lost in the story."
Here’s the link to buy it:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07C9XDC4V


MEDIA MATTERS

WALN TV

BOLD GOLD COMMUNITY FORUM

This week's guest is Barbara Giovagnoli, Lackawanna County Recycling Coordinator. Tune in Sunday morning at 6 on 94.3 The Talker; 6:30 on 1400-The Game, NEPA's Fox .Sports Radio and 106.7 fm; and at 7:30 on 105 The River.

ECTV LIVE

ECTV Live can be seen on Comcast channel 19 (61 in some areas) and is aired during the Noon, 6pm and Midnight hours each day of the week. Following Monday's Live program the show will become available on Electric City Television's YouTube channel which can be viewed on your computer.

BUDDY RUMCHEK

Want to hear some great parodies on the news? Tune in to WILK Radio at 6:40 and 8:40 AM on Mondays. As Ralph Cramden used to say, “It’s a laugh riot!”


BOBBY V IS BACK THIS SUNDAY!!!!!!

Bobby V's great Sunday night Doo Wop Show. 6P to 9P on The River 105 and 103.5 Go back to the beginning of Rock and Roll.
1960

Our 1960 logo

More than 100,000 students in South Korea marched in Seoul in protest over election fraud committed by President Syngman Rhee in the voting of March 15, beginning the "April Revolution". Police fired into the crowds, killing 140 protesters…Elvis Presley returned to Hollywood for the first time since his return from military service in Germany, to begin filming G.I. Blues…

After a week in which 6,000 East Germans fled to West Berlin, several DDR police crossed the border and began searching luggage at railroad stations. West Berlin police arrested two of the DDR police, while others fled. The exodus of thousands came after the East German government "collectivized" private farms and businesses and directed landowners and shopkeepers to become employees of state-owned cooperatives.. France's President Charles De Gaulle was given an enthusiastic welcome by 200,000 people upon his arrival in Washington, D.C., on the fifth day of his tour of the Western Hemisphere. President De Gaulle spoke to a joint session of Congress on April 25, urging nuclear disarmament, and was cheered by more than a million people the next day at a ticker-tape parade in New York….

in Pennsylvania, the Pittsburgh Steelers scour the college ranks to get themselves to a winning season…in Scranton Mayor James Hanlon is mum on his plans for 1961 in the Mayor’s race and fifty years ago this week the number one song in LuLac land and America was “Wild One” by Bobby Rydell.

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

The LuLac Ediotion #3762, April 18th, 2018

WRITE ON WEDNESDAY

Our “Write On Wednesday” logo.

Our good friend Ed Ackerman from Pittston Progress wrote a really compelling article on drug abuse. That dovetailed nicely with the Opioid fact Forum happening tomorrow night. Ed is one of the premier Communications professors in the area and is a brilliant writer. Here’s his take on the problem and the event.


KNIGHTS TO SHINE LIGHT ON OPIOID CRISIS

I’ve seen the needle
And the damage done
a little part of it in everyone
But every junkie’s
like a setting sun
That’s the last verse of one of my most favorite and most unfavorite songs: “The Needle and the Damage Done” by Neil Young. I love how it sounds. I hate what it says.
And while it is unfair to call someone battling drug addiction a “junkie,” and incorrect to assume all overdose deaths involve a needle, the song comes to mind every time I read something in the newspaper or hear something on TV about the opioid crisis in America, and more specifically here in Luzerne County.
The heartache that, yes, a loved one hooked on drugs is a lot “like a setting sun” is almost too much to bear.
And the notion that there’s “a little part of it in everyone” drives home the frightening truth that drug addiction can overtake anyone. You, me, our kids, our siblings, our friends. No one sets out to be a drug addict. As crazy as it sounds, it sort of just happens.
That’s part of a message West Pittston’s Carol Coolbaugh has attempted to bring to the public since her son, Erik, died of an overdose in 2009, after, according to a Citizens’ Voice article in August of 2017, “a lifetime battle with street drugs, like heroin.”
“Good people fall victim to this disease which they had no control over,” Coolbaugh is quoted as saying by writer Eric Mark in that article.
The organizer of the group GRASP, Grief Recovery After a Substance Passing, Coolbaugh will be one of the speakers Thursday evening, April 19, at the John P. Cosgrove Center at Pittston Memorial Library, when the Family Committee of the JFK Council of the Knights of Columbus, Pittston, presents an “Opioid Fact Forum.”
All interested are invited to hear Coolbaugh share her and her son’s story and the pain of losing a loved one to drug abuse, to hear Judge Michael Vough, Pittston, talk about the legal ramifications of drug abuse, and to hear County Coroner Bill Lisman relate the sobering statistics of drug-related deaths in Luzerne County. Carmen Ambrosino, a leading figure in the battle against drug and alcohol abuse for 45 years, will serve as moderator.
The forum runs from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and admission is free. The Citizens’ Voice and Greater Pittston Progress are media sponsors.
In a January 2018, article in the Citizens’ Voice, writers Bob Kalinowski and Bill Wellock, reveal Lisman’s statistics from the past two years: 153 overdose deaths in 2017 in Luzerne County; 140 in 2016. In another article, Kalinowski points out the oldest victim was 78, the youngest 18.
Approximately half of the deaths were related to opioids, with fentanyl, called “the most powerful synthetic opioid,” listed as the “most common killer.” Lisman, according to the report, said most victims had other drugs in their systems in addition to opioids. The “most common combination,” appearing in 69 of the deaths, was fentanyl and “other drugs.” Heroin and “other drugs” accounted for 40 of the deaths.
David Yonki, Pittston native and a Fourth Degree member of the JFK Council, proposed the forum to his fellow Knights and was met with overwhelming support. “The idea actually came to me in church,” Yonki said. “I began thinking that the answer to the opioid problem might lie in faith and in communication. Families that communicate, that talk to one another, might have a better chance of avoiding this problem.”
He added that there is a misconception when someone dies of an overdose that it was “on purpose.” That is not typically the case, he said.
Yonki said the presentation by Judge Vough will be “very compelling.” He said Vough will take the audience through a day in his courtroom, “how he talks to, how he sentences” someone convicted of a drug-related crime.
The whole night will be “very impactful,” Yonki said.
I don’t doubt it.
Another verse in that Neil Young song goes like this:
I hit the city and
I lost my band
I watched the needle
Take another man
Gone, gone, the damage don
I’ve seen the needle
And the damage done
a little part of it in everyone
But every junkie’s
like a setting sun
That’s the last verse of one of my most favorite and most unfavorite songs: “The Needle and the Damage Done” by Neil Young. I love how it sounds. I hate what it says.
And while it is unfair to call someone battling drug addiction a “junkie,” and incorrect to assume all overdose deaths involve a needle, the song comes to mind every time I read something in the newspaper or hear something on TV about the opioid crisis in America, and more specifically here in Luzerne County.
The heartache that, yes, a loved one hooked on drugs is a lot “like a setting sun” is almost too much to bear.
And the notion that there’s “a little part of it in everyone” drives home the frightening truth that drug addiction can overtake anyone. You, me, our kids, our siblings, our friends. No one sets out to be a drug addict. As crazy as it sounds, it sort of just happens.
That’s part of a message West Pittston’s Carol Coolbaugh has attempted to bring to the public since her son, Erik, died of an overdose in 2009, after, according to a Citizens’ Voice article in August of 2017, “a lifetime battle with street drugs, like heroin.”
“Good people fall victim to this disease which they had no control over,” Coolbaugh is quoted as saying by writer Eric Mark in that article.
The organizer of the group GRASP, Grief Recovery After a Substance Passing, Coolbaugh will be one of the speakers Thursday evening, April 19, at the John P. Cosgrove Center at Pittston Memorial Library, when the Family Committee of the JFK Council of the Knights of Columbus, Pittston, presents an “Opioid Fact Forum.”
All interested are invited to hear Coolbaugh share her and her son’s story and the pain of losing a loved one to drug abuse, to hear Judge Michael Vough, Pittston, talk about the legal ramifications of drug abuse, and to hear County Coroner Bill Lisman relate the sobering statistics of drug-related deaths in Luzerne County. Carmen Ambrosino, a leading figure in the battle against drug and alcohol abuse for 45 years, will serve as moderator.
The forum runs from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and admission is free. The Citizens’ Voice and Greater Pittston Progress are media sponsors.
In a January 2018, article in the Citizens’ Voice, writers Bob Kalinowski and Bill Wellock, reveal Lisman’s statistics from the past two years: 153 overdose deaths in 2017 in Luzerne County; 140 in 2016. In another article, Kalinowski points out the oldest victim was 78, the youngest 18.
Approximately half of the deaths were related to opioids, with fentanyl, called “the most powerful synthetic opioid,” listed as the “most common killer.” Lisman, according to the report, said most victims had other drugs in their systems in addition to opioids. The “most common combination,” appearing in 69 of the deaths, was fentanyl and “other drugs.” Heroin and “other drugs” accounted for 40 of the deaths.
David Yonki, Pittston native and a Fourth Degree member of the JFK Council, proposed the forum to his fellow Knights and was met with overwhelming support. “The idea actually came to me in church,” Yonki said. “I began thinking that the answer to the opioid problem might lie in faith and in communication. Families that communicate, that talk to one another, might have a better chance of avoiding this problem.”
He added that there is a misconception when someone dies of an overdose that it was “on purpose.” That is not typically the case, he said.
Yonki said the presentation by Judge Vough will be “very compelling.” He said Vough will take the audience through a day in his courtroom, “how he talks to, how he sentences” someone convicted of a drug-related crime.
The whole night will be “very impactful,” Yonki said.
I don’t doubt it.
Another verse in that Neil Young song goes like this:
I hit the city and
I lost my band
I watched the needle
Take another man
Gone, gone, the damage done.
Those two words “gone, gone” make me want to cry.
Ed Ackerman writes The Optimist every week. Look for his blogs online during the week at pittstonprogress.com.